The Butcher’s Guide: What is a Chateaubriand Roast?

  • by Omaha Steaks
chateaubriand roast sliced with cranberry sauce
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A chateaubriand is a filet mignon roast, simply put. Chateaubriand is also the most decadent, tender beef roast and is perfect for special occasions and holidays. This roast-size filet mignon designed to impress with mild, delicate beef flavor and incredible tenderness. Here’s everything you need to know about this one-of-a-kind cut of beef.

What’s in a name?

The chateaubriand is known by several names – filet mignon roast, tenderloin roast, or simply beef tenderloin. 

At Omaha Steaks, we refer to this decadent cut of beef as a chateaubriand. This French word is named after 19th century French Romantic writer, François-René de Chateaubriand, who enjoyed this cut of beef. It now translates to mean “a very thick steak cut from the fillet of beef”. Whatever name you give this supremely tender roast, it’s an epicurean experience you won’t forget.

Cutting a chateaubriand

The chateaubriand is cut from the tenderloin, which is part of the loin primal.  This is the same sub-primal as the filet mignon, the origin of the most tender steak cut. This highly-prized cut of beef only represents 2-3% of the total animal.

The tenderloin can be sliced into filet mignon steaks or left whole and trimmed into a chateaubriand roast – a roast-size filet mignon.

Why so tender?

The secret of the chateaubriand’s tenderness is due to its location on the animal. The tenderloin is a non-weight-bearing muscle that gets very little exercise. Inactivity keeps the muscle from growing too tough through repetitive movement. At Omaha Steaks, we age beef tenderloins 21-28 days to naturally maximize that tenderness for an even better eating experience.

Although incredibly tender, a chateaubriand contains less marbling – the small streaks of intramuscular fat – compared to a prime rib roast. But cook your chateaubriand right and it’s incredibly tender – you can cut it with a dull butter knife.

How to cook a chateaubriand

The mild flavor and low marbling of the chateaubriand roast pairs well rich sauces, demi-glace sauces, flavored butters, or a bacon wrap. This roast is best cooked rare to medium-rare. Try this simple butcher’s butter recipe with fresh herbs to add rich, delicate flavors to your chateaubriand roast.

Sear and slow roast method: 

Thaw roasts 24-48 hours in refrigerator. Preheat the oven to 250°F. Lightly oil and season roast. Sear roasts in a large pan, with small amount of oil, or on the grill for 2-3 minutes on each side or until well browned. Place the roast on an elevated rack in a roasting pan. Refer to this roast cooking chart and use a kitchen thermometer. Allow 15-20 minutes resting time before slicing and serving.

Quick roast method:

Preheat oven to 400°F. Lightly oil and season roast. Place on an elevated rack in a roasting pan. Roast uncovered, using the cooking timer from the Omaha Steaks app and a kitchen thermometer for desired doneness. Allow 20-40 minutes resting time before slicing.

You can also wrap the roast in a bacon weave and smoke it for an impressive feast. The fat from the bacon pairs perfectly with the mild flavors of the roast in our bacon wrapped smoked chateaubriand recipe. 

Serving the chateaubriand

The chateaubriand is perfect for a special dinner or for a memorable small gathering. Omaha Steaks 2 lb. chateaubriand serves four, and our 4 lb. roast serve eight. For an extra-decadent experience, try our Private Reserve 3 lb. chateaubriand roast. It’s triple-trimmed by our master butchers and extra-aged a full 28 days for extreme tenderness.

Enjoy a decadent chateaubriand roast for your next holiday meal or special occasion. Your guests will love you!

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